About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 21
MSNBCW 21
FBC 9
CSPAN 6
CNN 4
CSPAN2 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
KQED (PBS) 3
CNBC 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
MSNBC 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 116
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 116 (some duplicates have been removed)
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
>> eric: we'll be keeping tabs on egypt. >> shannon bream is next, live in washington. >> reporter: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who supp
and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
of that craziness. >> the new protest out of egypt this morning because what started out as some protests in tahrir square has spilled over to other parts of the country. this all comes after thursday's decrees from egyptian president mohammed morsi basically saying you know that judiciary that we have? you know the judges that we have? if i make a decision, they are not going to be able to review anything that i do anymore. essentially cutting out the judiciary becoming by all accounts a dictator. >> yeah. all the checks on his power were essentially removed. and it did appear that this guy became a dick day or two overnight. what was worrisome about it is how quickly it all happened. and basically a 12 to 24 hour span after the united states congratulated mohammed morsi on doing such a great job helping to broker a peace agreement between hamas and israel which may beer maybe not. maybe he did a great job. there are also arms being smuggled through egypt so maybe he got too much credit. >> he seized the day. his name is on top of all newspapers. here i am, i need to consolidate power this morning
at the presidential palace in egypt who assured me there was no announcement yet to be made from the presidential palace regarding a truce agreement. he gave me a simple explanation. the president's sister passed away in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a ve
room" starts now. >>> happening now, police fire tear gas as demonstrations in egypt turn violent. angry protesters accuse egypt's president of betraying the revolution. and in the word of one critic, making himself a pharoah. what happened before and after u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. did in the moments before killing osama bin laden. >>> wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's astonishing show of fury in egypt. within the past hour egyptian authorities tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look
center stage in protests in egypt. the president seizes more power, undermining the country's democratic reform. the turmoil follows a still fragile cease-fire in gaza as the middle east takes another volatile turn. >>> at home, white house critics press for more answers about what went wrong in libya, and whether officials were truthful with the public. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >>> my guests this morning weigh in. chairman of the armed services committee carl levin. and chairman of the house homeland security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'l
. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this morning to disburse protesters in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term
's always a pleasure. thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> and up next, protests in egypt and the turnover on the president's foreign policy team. we'll talk to dennis ross. >>> and still ahead, former bush national security adviser steven hadley, plus our correspondents in the field. this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children and a
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
grab by egypt's president has thousands of people protesting in the streets of cairo. latest on what is happening in egypt after the break. >> it is easy to be a liberal when you have a million dollars in the bank. he doesn't need a union for rich people. if he feels that way and warren buffett and these guys feel that way get your checkbook and show us what occurs. stuart: to fire about patriotic millionaires, a lot of people fired about the facebook page. we told you we were going into triple digits. the dow is up 100 points and there is light volume today. big money people can move the market and apparently, let's go to robert gray. robert: the tech outpacing the broader market. tech stocks in the s&p down leading the charge and it is down below $9 with a disappointing earnings just a week ago and certainly ramping into the black holiday and shopping for electronic gadgets. michael dell said the windows 8 launch last month, giving consumers a real reason to upgrade in several years. the touch screen technology, convertible and hybrid, basically tablets', laptops at the same time t
strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting israel all through this. made israel feel moderate and the arabs feel realistic. the second piece of good news is that egypt, even under the muslim brotherhood, has an interest in having stability. that's very important. the bad news is the islamists are in control. in the palestinian areas with hamas and certainly in control in egypt. and there's going to be no peace as long as they are there in control, and u.s. policy has got to be a long, gradual process of trying to build up the non-islamists in the arab world, including in iran, across the region. >> that frames it. we'll hear more from you in the roundtable. >>> now let me turn to carl levin, chairman of course of the armed services committee in the senate. senator, to egypt. how concerned are you? is morsi a partner of the united states, or a p
a deal before that happens will not work. the key to this -- egypt 40 years ago signed a peace treaty for israel. for 40 years they have not shot at each other. this is a different egypt now. it will all be about egypt. egypt has a really tight line to walk. if it somehow joins with the muscle burn brotherhood, america will cut them of their aid. i think egypt tries to walk right down the middle. i do not think they get involved dagen: do so with the president and prime minister was saying her in the last week. >> yes. the egyptian president worries that the way he came to power was they got rid of the last dictator. if he does not look sympathetic to the islamic cause and into israel, they will say who needs you. connell: as always, k.t. mcfarland, thank you for coming on. >> thank you. connell: we have some breaking news before we move on. the justice department has filed a lawsuit against ebay. they are saying that the agreement illuminated a significant former competition for the employees. watch ebay today. at the moment, the stock is up $0.56. the state of california had a simil
situations in the middle east. angry protests against an apparent power grab in egypt while there are new concerns about a break in the israeli gaza cease fire. meanwhile, back here after the holiday weekend ends, the fiscal cliff negotiations will heat up. now the speaker of the house has thrown a new problem into the talks, can a deal actually be reached? >>> shoppers looking for their own kind of grand bargain today. we're going to look at the black friday crush at shopping malls and super stores all over this country. but we start this hour with breaking news in egypt. you're looking at live pictures of tahrir square in cairo after the new egyptian president morsi gave himself sweeping new powers today. tahrir square also the heart of last year's uprising. demonstrators filled the streets of alexandria later today. morsi's new powers put his own decisions above all legal challenges until a new egyptian parliament is elected. despite the protests, morsi moving ahead with his plans at the same time insisting that his new powers are for the good ofu issued a statement moments ago saying
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
saying there will be a an aments early as tonight. from egypt they are saying israeli aggression will cease. israeli air strikes continue to pound away at the gaza strip. we are at over 110 deaths inside the gaza strip. much of hamas and islamic jihad infrastructure has been damaged as has been their ability to launch rockets. that was the point, to destroy their ability to launch rockets. also to take out jihad military wings which they have done as well. secretary of state hillary clinton will land here in israel. meet with prime minister netanyahu and we have heard a couple high-ranking officials here in israel including the german foreign minister and the unitetheunited nations secretary-general. the actual cease-fire announcement could happen in egypt as the fighting continues here. bill: what have you observed in the past several hours where you are? what's happening on the ground, leland? >> reporter: you would think in the few hours before a cease-fire things would lighten up. not in the middle east. everybody wants to get in as many shots as they can. the israeli militar
gay people straight. she'll join me next. >>> plus, as egypt's president comes under fire, president morsi speaks out about president obama. speaking live with someone that just interviewed morsi, don't miss this. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. >>> now to egypt. several new developments today. first off, dmon straights prompted the u.s. to shut down the embassy there. the embassy was not under fire but clashes between protesters and riot police clogged streets around the complex. this chaos is going on for days as demonstrators threatened the new islamic president morsi with a second revolution. >>> and then there's this. lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is seen by some of morsi's critics as an effort by the muslim brotherhood to hijack the constitution. and amid all of this, president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. "time" calls him the most important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credi
the last few days about how the nation of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fir
looked at the meeting being anywhere near sufficient in clarifying. let's go to egypt where there are genuine foreign policy issues and contentions needing to be resolved. is he trying to rush this through too quickly? what do we know about what the document itself will look like, and whether or not it will be one that captures the democratic principles that we hope that egypt moves forward with. >> there are loads of questions and you put your finger on many of them. let's be hopeful to suggest that this may be a marchbury versus madison moment in egypt. you have constitutions playing their role. president morsi has been fighting hard to make sure there is an effective executive. you have a judiciary who wants to display its independence. unfortunately you don't have a parliament dissolved by egypt's equivalent of the supreme court. i think there are very serious questions about this constitutional assembly, not so much formation but 25% of it reflects the religious minorities and women have walked out because they don't think their issues are being adequately addressed. i
to tel aviv. those were iranian-made missiles, and a big part of the ceasefire was pressure put on egypt to stop the smuggling tunnels. the question is whether iran will continue to keep smuggling weapons in, that's most likely a yes. number three, will the egyptians stop it, and number three, will islamic jihad listen to hamas and stop the rocket fire or will they continue to cause problems here for israel. back to you. gregg: leland vittert, thanks very much. so will the ceasefire hold? what does this mean for hillary clinton and her shuttle diplomacy? general jack keane advised hillary clinton for many, many years, he will join us in just a couple of minutes. >> meanwhile, a trio of u.s. warships sent to the eastern mediterranean area just in case americans need to be evacuated out of israel. the ships were due to return to norfolk, virginia, but their homecoming will be a bit delayed by at least several days. reports say these ships would not play a combat role and would only be used to help americans in that area. they can also serve as floating hospitals if need be. >>> susan rice
options. the thing to watch is egypt. from minister of egypt in the gaza strip right now with hamas and he is potentially talking about three things. we will open the border between the gaza strip and the dividend, military and supplies to come through. will egypt break that 40 year peace treaty with israel? if they do will they join the side of hamas, and the whole regional war. stuart: i don't mean to be crass but this is a financial program and i will ask a crass question. as an investor why should i care what you are talking about? >> it is an unstable part of the world because of two things. iran, israel, the persian gulf, nobody is making any effort to understand and they should, the suez canal is between israel and egypt and a lot of trade flows between europe and south asia. if you lose the suez canal, very easy to mine the suez canal, the long, narrow canal with bad guys shooting and tankers, that would be a significant economic crisis. stuart: what about the economics, the economy being the driver, i can think of a prosperous north african muslim society, i can think of all of th
issue is egypt, they are supporting the palestinian tph-s this matter. we are looking at the results of the arab spring. jon: egypt now run by the muslim brotherhood of which hamas is an offshoot. >> that's right. morisi has come out in support of the palestinians. even though the rocket attacks, this violence was initiated by the palestinians. you have the camp david aeu koerbgsdz thaccords, the arab spring. the middle east is a mess. look in iran the centrifuges are still spinning. secretary panetta, and secretary clinton are in asia right now. that pivot, are we pivoting away from the challenges and our interests in the middle east, which is really a mess. jon: you worry we are leaving the israelis high and dry on this one? >> it could be. i don't know exactly what is going on with the administration. they have mad said some of the right things in sue mort of supporting israel. we are reaping the fruits of our labors in the middle east. and our policies in the middle east has been a real failure. if we are shipping through the pacific where are we going to have the planes and tank
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
of trying to achieve a long-term or durable solution to this problem. of course, he also spoke with egypt's president morsi, reiterated similar ideas, emphasized the importance of a long-term, more durable solution. he thanked morsi for the role he played in brokering this cease-fire. i'm told by senior administration officials that the president's relationship with mohamed morsi really got stronger throughout this process. so, they're encouraged by that. they are also saying secretary clinton really played a key role in these negotiations, so they are cautiously optimistic. >> two thoughts on that. i mean, obviously, secretary clinton's role, it was, you know, a high-risk decision to send her there. she's managed to come away with a deal. obviously, she and the president deserve a tremendous amount of credit. also this idea of strengthening the relationship with morsi because what i've heard from administration officials is they're concerned they haven't had the leverage with morsi they may have had with the previous head of egypt. are you picking that up as well? >> reporter: absolutely
's go new to egypt where there's another political crisis brewing and some of it is taking place exactly where the arab spring started. got new video to share with you here of opponents demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed m
hillary clinton has obviously been very busy moving between jerusalem, the west bank, egypt. nbc's stephanie gosk is live in tel aviv. what are you hearing about the cease fire? >> reporter: you know, we were on the cusp of a cease-fire it seemed like last night and it seemingly fell apart. however, we did hear from israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu that they still want a diplomatic solution, which is a real sign that at the very least the negotiations are still going on. we know that secretary clinton is shuttling back and forth throughout the region trying to make that happen. it's complicated today, chris, by this bus blast in jerusalem. there were at least 11 people injured, several of them seriously. officials here are calling it a terrorist attack although not a suicide attack. and as you know, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after
is thrown together in egypt. we know they are an important relationship with us. what do we do? what does the united states do? >> we have to recognize our limitations. we can only play on the margins. money changes everything. morsy is achilles' heel, that is really the economy. tourism is gone. it is very important to them. foreign investment has essentially dried up. we do spend well over a billion dollars in aid, primarily to the military every year. it filters through the economy. we should stop -- connell: we should stop doing that? >> if morsy pushes through the constitution, there is no reason to continue sending over billions of dollars a year. it also looks like under this constitution that morsy bought off the army. they get the money. they spend it anyway they want. this constitution, as i understand it, there will be no interference by the army with the government. he has a good chance of becoming this software powered dictator. connell: thank you, sir. i appreciate you coming on. corporations paying out these early dividends. they are trying to be the coming tax hikes. our q
of peace looking at the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia and libya. the arab spring are in the state of transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each. this took place earlier this week in washington. it's two hours. >> good morning everyone. i'm steve heydemann for issues of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on the securities sector reform in the arab world and some rsvp to me have been scared by the false rumor that it would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that is not the case. so you do not need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you here with us all this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important but also especially urgent. i do not think that it is an exaggeration to say what happens with the security sectors in the arab world and by security sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus that
with us. who was the strongest player in that whole period? it was egypt. egypt was strong because egypt has peace with israel. the way to be strong is not by making war and unilateral declarations in the u.n. that have no meaning. the way to gain strength is to be a partner. >> is the cease-fire holding? >> cease-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wa
asking you about what's going on in egypt right now where muhammad morsi must feel pretty emboldened after playing such a crucial role in helping to broker a ceasefire between's reel and hamas. -- between israel and hamas. he is now sort of changing the law of the land, a power grab. how's this going to work out? is. >> well, i think he's revealed his true stripes. this is not democracy in action, this is a classic effort at one person, one vote, one time. he's, obviously, met resistance. let's hope it's successful. but i think it's just highly ironic that after dozens of commentators left and right in this country hailed muhammad morsi for his responsible conduct with respect to gaza and how he wasn't acting like an an extremist from the muslim brotherhood got what he, got what he needed from the ceasefire agreement and immediately began acting like an extremist from the muslim brotherhood. that should be what we focus on going forward. and for anybody who thinks the ceasefire in gaza is durable, all they had to do was read these headlines about what morsi did in egypt the day after
to get her confirmed potentially at as the next secretary of state. that's next. plus, egypt's president sparked enormous protests when he gave himself broad new powers. basically made himself a dictator. and in a matter of hours, he is set to address his people for the first time since. but will he back down or make things worse for his country and probably ours, too? it's all ahead for the journalists of fox news on this wednesday fox report. it's great to have you in. a cus. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. johan comes in a porcelain vessel, crafted with care by a talented blonde from sweden. ♪ smooth, rich, never bitter, gevalia. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. i'm going to dream about that steak. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours.
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
and israel, that eight-day bombardment of rockets going back and forth and egypt having to step in to broker a peace deal, do you think that if the u.n. recognizes statehood that palestine and palestinians and israeli negotiations would be better suited to coming up to a longer standing two-state solution? >> to get a state that will have only through negotiations. they know it. we know it. united states knows it. all the europeans know it. after the operations in gaza they feel maybe -- they have to encourage him and do everything to -- maybe help him. they had like to help him by the recognition today. it's a meaningless resolution. to get a state should be only through negotiations. all of us knows it. we are trying to negotiate with them since we took power. not only us. the former prime minister offered them almost everything. 98.5% of the territory. they didn't say yes. when barak was prime minister of israel, he offered the same to arafat and arafat said yes -- said no. so now since we took power, they put any obstacle they could in order to resume the negotiations. first they ask pri
, michael steele and jonathan capehart onset as well. rick stengel went to interview the president of egypt. obviously he's the man at the center of all the action in the middle east right now. we're all trying to figure out who he is. i learned something by reading "time" magazine. i found out he's a usc grad and still a trojans fan. little known fact. >> always start with the important parts of life. >> i'm sure he's very upset with what happened with the notre dame game. more importantly, who is this man who seems to be an accidental president who suddenly feels very comfortable with seizing power in the most important arab state in the planet? >> it's really interesting. this interview done by rick stengel and my colleagues is amazing because it sheds some light on this man who is really an ig enigma. he's walking var fine line between hard core islamists and others in the middle east. one of the most interesting things in the interview is how he feels about the u.s. that's been a big question mark for everyone here. what is this man's relationship to the u.s. what is our relationship w
-fire or a truce. they tried doing that a day ago using egypt as the intermediary, that fell through. now egypt has taken its ambassador out of israel, so who will do the mediation and who will try to get in between these two warring factions and try to get them to come together to stop this is going to be a real difficult, a real problem, i think, for the time being. but israel is saying, look, if you keep send rockets into our country, we are going to respond and we are going to respond with force. >> sara sidner inside gaza. >> wondering about that response inside the neighboring country. >>> coming up, how the president will pay personal attentions to the victims of sandy, just hours from now. [ boys screaming ] hi, i just switched jobs, and i want to roll over my old 401(k) into a fidelity ira. man: okay, no problem. it's easy to get started; i can help you with the paperwork. um...this green line just appeared on my floor. yeah, that's fidelity helping you reach your financial goals. could you hold on a second? it's your money. roll over your old 401(k) into a fidelity ira and take control of
became a symbol of the war in gaza when the visiting prime minister of egypt and the hamas prime minister touched the dead and i the child who was martyre. >> translator: the blood son both of our hands, ours and on the egyptian hands. >> reporter: we watched more children being brought into the hospital. the doctors say several have died, including a child burned to death. >> as a doctor, as a human, i am crying. i can't do anything for him because i know he's died now, you know. and you can't imagine if it's your baby how you feel. why? why? >> reporter: influx of casualties, men, women and children, is overwhelming this hospital underlying how this war is not just between soldiers. civilians on both sides of the border are enduring the grinding pain of loss. >>> that was sara sidner reporting. israeli civilians are also getting caught in the crossfire. our frederik pleitgen reports several rockets fired from gaza caused injuries in southern israel this morning. we'll take you live to that region next hour. >>> 400 bullets, two assault rifles and a ticket to "twilight." why police belie
through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 116 (some duplicates have been removed)